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Import from non-listed countries outside EU

Countries outside EU which do not have a control system for rabies are called non-listed countries outside EU. The risk that animals are infected with rabies is greater in these countries, and the requirements concerning rabies protection are therefore stricter upon import from these countries. To the right is a link to a site where you can see the different groups and lists of countries. The requirements for bringing a dog, cat or ferret to Sweden from a non-listed country outside EU are described below.

Microchip


Dogs, cats and ferrets that travel to or within the EU must be identity marked with a microchip. Please observe that chips of ISO-standard must be used in order to avoid bringing your own scanner.

An animal that has been tattooed before 3 July 2011 and has a passport or a veterinary certificate where the date of marking is stated will however not need to be microchipped.

Please make sure your animal is identity marked marked before you proceed with vaccination and titre testing.

Vaccination against rabies


Dogs, cats and ferrets must be vaccinated against rabies. Vaccination must be preceded by identity marking as described above. The animal must be vaccinated according to the vaccine producer´s recommendations. Most vaccines may not be used until the animal is three months of age.

If your animal has been vaccinated but is not identity marked, you will have to have it microchipped and then revaccinated against rabies. The new vaccination then counts as a primary vaccination.
 
After the primary vaccination, revaccination must be done according to the scheme which the producer of the vaccine recommends. The last date of revaccination is stated in the passport or the vaccination certificate. If revaccination is delayed beyond the last date of revaccination, the rabies antibody test will have to be repeated — see more below.

Rabies antibody titre test


You must have your dog, cat or ferret tested for rabies antibodies. The test must be analyzed by an EU-approved laboratory and show at least 0,5 IU/ml. To the right you find a link to the list of EU-approved laboratories within the EU as well as one to those outside the EU.

The sample may be taken as soon as at least 30 days have passed since the latest rabies vaccination. Samples taken earlier are not valid, and there are no exemptions. If the basic vaccination consists of two shots, you must not sample the animal until at least 30 days have passed since the second shot. For example: Vaccination March 1 and April 1 = sampling no earlier than May 1.
 
If the animal is revaccinated on time continuously after having passed the antibody test, no more testing is needed.

Returning with pet passport


An animal that has gone through both identity marking, rabies vaccination and has passed rabies antibody testing while being in the EU may travel to a third country and back again as soon as the titer test result is noted in the passport by a veterinarian.

If the animal is travelling in a group of six or more pets or as a trade or freight animal (please see below), you need a veterinary certificate even if you have a passport. You will find more information about the different veterinary certificates below.

Animals without a passport must wait 90 days until they can have a veterinary certificate


A dog, cat or ferret that has no pet passport will need a veterinary certificate. To have a certificate, the animal must go through microchip marking, rabies vaccination and pass the rabies antibody test. You must then wait until 90 days have passed since the date of sampling for antibodies until you can have the veterinary certificate issued. Make sure that the rabies vaccination is still valid after the 90-days period.

Two different veterinary certificates


Please observe that there are two different kinds of veterinary certificates.
You need the certificate for up to five dogs, cats or ferrets, form number E9.163 if the animal
  • travels with the owner or a representative as personal luggage or on the same flight as freight
You need the veterinary certificate for trade animals, form number E9.164 if the animal
  • travels in a group of more than five dogs, cats and/or ferrets
  • is to be sold or change owner
  • travels alone without the owner or a representative

Certificate for up to five pets


If you are bringing one to five pet dogs, cats and/or ferrets that travel with you either in a car, train or boat, or in a plane as your personal luggage or as freight on the same flight, you need a veterinary certificate on the form E9.163. The same goes if you let a representative accompany the animal during the travel.

The certificate must be issued by an official veterinarian, i.e a veterinarian employed by the state to issue export certificates (these veterinarians have different titles in different countries). You bring the vaccination certificates to the veterinarian along with your pet. The vaccination certificates are then stapled together with the veterinary certificate and stamped on all sides. You can order the form via the link to the right. 

If the animal travels alone as freight without an accompanying person, is to be sold or otherwise change owner, or if it travels in a group of six or more animals, there are other requirements, see more below.

If you travel from EU to a non-listed third country and back with one to five dogs, cats and/or ferrets that have EU pet passports and do not qualify as trade animals, you only need to show the passport(-s) with identity number and a valid rabies vaccination when you return. No veterinary certificate is needed.

You bring the vaccination certificates and the laboratory test result to the veterinarian along with your pet. The vaccination certificates and the test result are then stapled together with the veterinary certificate and stamped on all sides. You can order the form via the link to the right.

If the animal travels as freight, is to be sold or otherwise change owner, or if it travels in a group of six or more animals, there are other requirements, see more below.

If you travel from EU to a non-listed third country and back with one to five dogs, cats and/or ferrets that have EU pet passports and do not qualify as trade animals, you only need to show the passport(-s) with identity number and a valid rabies vaccination when you return. No veterinary certificate is needed.

Examination and certificate for pets in groups of six or more animals


Dogs, cats and ferrets that travel in groups of six or more animals (regardless of species, could be e.g four dogs and two cats) must be examined by a veterinarian within 24 hours before beginning the travel, and they need a veterinary certificate on form E9.164. The certificate is needed even if the animals originate from EU and have passports.

The certificate must be issued by an official veterinarian, i.e a veterinarian employed by the state to issue export certificates (these veterinarians have different titles in different countries).

Preferably, you book a time with the official veterinarian within 24 hours before you leave, and ask for both the examination and the certificate. You bring the vaccination certificates to the veterinarian along with your pet. The vaccination certificates are then stapled together with the veterinary certificate and stamped on all sides.
 
You order the form E9.164 via the link to the right. It is the same form which is used for trade animals, but when used for animals travelling in a group it has a longer validity than for trade animals. From the date of issuing, the certificate is valid for four months or until one of the animals must be revaccinated against rabies, whichever comes first. If any of the animals must be revaccinated before four months have passed and you want to travel more, you need to get a new certificate.
 
If two or more persons travel together with six or more pets, the pets may be divided into one group of five per each person. If none of the person ends up with more than five pets, neither the examination nor the group certificate is needed.
 

Examination and certificate for trade and freight animals


Dogs, cats and ferrets that are to be sold or change owner after their arrival in Sweden as well as animals travelling as freight without the owner or a representative must all be examined by a veterinarian within 24 hours before beginning the travel, and they need a veterinary certificate on form E9.164. The certificate is needed even if the animals originate from EU and have passports.

The certificate must be issued by an official veterinarian, i.e a veterinarian employed by the state to issue export certificates (these veterinarians have different titles in different countries).

Preferably, you book a time with the official veterinarian within 24 hours before you leave, and ask for both the examination and the certificate. You bring the vaccination certificates and the laboratory test result to the veterinarian along with your pet. The vaccination certificates and the test result are then stapled together with the veterinary certificate and stamped on all sides.  

You order the form E9.164 via the link to the right. It is the same form which is used for pets travelling in groups of six or more animals, but when used for trade and freight animals the certificate is valid for only 10 days from the date of issuing.  

If you bring an animal to Sweden that you have bought abroad and that travels as personal goods with you or a person representing you, and you do not bring more than five animals together, the animal does not need the examination or the veterinary certificate.

Entering from outside EU directly to Sweden

Entry points: Stockholm/Arlanda and Gothenburg/Landvetter


Animals from countries outside EU must enter the EU via an approved entry point. For animals entering Sweden directly from a country outside EU, there are two entry points: Stockholm/Arlanda airport and Gothenburg/Landvetter airport.

Border inspection control of trade animals and groups of more than five pets


The animals which according to information above need the E9.164 certificate must go through border inspection control upon arrival in Sweden. The control may be performed on either of the border inspection posts on Arlanda or Landvetter airport. You will be charged a fee for the inspection. The fee is lower during work hours on week days. You must contact the border inspection post and book a time for the control at least one working day before arrival. Contact information to the border inspection posts is found to the right.

Customs control of pet animals


One to five dogs, cats or ferrets that travel as personal luggage and are not intended for trade will be checked by customs upon entry. They animal must be presented to customs at Red Point and you must show the passport and/or the veterinary certificate.
 

Entry via another EU country


Animals that have entered EU via another country and have gone through necessary controls may enter Sweden via the route of choice, provided that proof can be shown that the animals have passed the controls (stamp from the controlling authority or a common veterinary entry document from border inspection control). A list of approved entry points in the EU is found to the right.

Dogs that stay permanently must be registered


If you have brought a foreign dog to Sweden to stay permanently, it must be registered in the central dog register. Please ask your local veterinarian for help to get the dog registered.
Last updated: 2012-06-29